Author Topic: The Medway Queen  (Read 317 times)

Offline AlanTH

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Re: The Medway Queen
« Reply #9 on: January 28, 2021, 10:25:43 AM »
Hi Signals. I've always thought it was Sheerness but I may be wrong. I was only around 6 or 7 at the time. Maybe big sister in NZ will remember better so I'll ask her.
AlanH.

Offline Cosmo Smallpiece

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Re: The Medway Queen
« Reply #8 on: January 26, 2021, 02:24:59 PM »
I've never been on the MQ. I found the following dates here which may explain the different recollections of the sailing points (may also age the posters!  ;) ).


Quote
Her regular itinerary started at Strood, with calls at Chatham (until 1959) and Sheerness (until 1954), and onward to Southend and either Clacton or Herne Bay. In June 1953, she was in the official line-up at the Coronation Review of the Fleet at Spithead. After seventeen post-war seasons, she made her last sailing on 8 September 1963.
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From https://www.nationalhistoricships.org.uk/register/46/medway-queen

Offline Dave Smith

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Re: The Medway Queen
« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2021, 12:12:44 PM »
In the late 30's, during my Dad's holiday week from the Yard, we usually had a " grand day out" to Southend on the M.Q.- or other paddle steamers, leaving from Sun pier- Gillingham? Like others, I was always fascinated by the engine & the paddle wheels. Watched from the viewing platform, they seemed enormous to a "little lad". I think I would have loved someone to explain the rudiments of the engine, how the back & forth of the pistons/ con rods was transmitted to circular motion via the crankshaft & thence to turn the paddle wheels. So simple that I think I would have understood. But sadly, it was not to be & not until years later did I learn about those things.

Offline Pete

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Re: The Medway Queen
« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2021, 09:22:40 AM »
We used to go Strood -Sheerness regularly, I think she crossed over to Southend then. pretty sure she docked at the (now hidden) Pier. Like AlanTH , recollections of the engine room which you could view and the paddle wheels

Offline Signals99

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Re: The Medway Queen
« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2021, 06:08:42 AM »
AlanTH,interesting you mention Sheerness,I never once remember the Medway queen calling at Shepy,during my many trips on her,please can you enlighten me as to the point of landing ?

Offline AlanTH

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Re: The Medway Queen
« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2021, 10:25:20 AM »
Just a mite fanciful methinks Alec. I too travelled from the Sun Pier on the Medway Queen and can't recall anything as grand as that for us ordinary types. Of course we may have been lower on the social ladder so not entitled to such things. :)
Anyway, I have a pic somewhere from those days long gone of the whole family after getting off the Queen and walking on the seafront at Sheerness.
I also saw that mighty engine as it seemed to me at the tender age of  7 or so. All that brass and big wheels. Huge paddles thrashing the water. Wonderful stuff for a little boy.
Great memories.
AlanTH.

Offline Signals99

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Re: The Medway Queen
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2021, 01:16:38 AM »
My family lived in Rochester ,so all our trips on the Medway queen began at Strood Pier ,even today I can recall the intense excitement felt by my boyish heart when the day of the trip arrived.
One ritual stands out ,that was as we passed the trots of the reserve fleet opposite the yard ,Moored in rows , my father(ex RN) would reel of the names of the ships.Of course the engine was my delight ,so much to see ,
Later in life a family member ,by marriage ,one Bert Payen was the night watch man on board,for many a year,allso my ex wife ,mr Payens nice , worked in the tea rooms on board,thanks for the memories guys.

Offline Invicta Alec

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Re: The Medway Queen
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2021, 02:55:28 PM »
Nice account John!


One of my earliest memories is boarding a paddle steamer at Chatham's Sun Pier. I'm pretty sure it was the Medway Queen. Do I remember a group of straw boater wearing musicians playing gently on the deck as we sailed along?
Or is that just fanciful recollection on my part?


Alec.


Offline John Walker

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The Medway Queen
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2021, 02:29:28 PM »
In the 1950s I used to watch the Paddle Steamers berth on the end of Herne Bay pier.  Probably the Medway Queen was one of them. 


My Dad worked at Chartham Paper Mill and one year, the mill outing was a trip to Southend on a paddle steamer.  We went on a coach to Sun Pier and boarded the Medway Queen.  Many of the men headed straight for the bar downstairs.  I was fascinated by the engines which you could view at close hand.  We berthed at Southend Pier and took the train to the beach end of the pier.  We had wall to wall blue sky the whole day.  As well as the amusements and a fish and chip lunch, we spent some time in the Kursaal Amusement Park.  On the way back I was down in the engine room area with another lad about my age.  There was a low door ahead of the paddle wheel.  The other lad stood on the handle so that he could get a good view of the paddle wheel going round.  When he got down, it was my turn.  As I leaned out, the door came open but fortunately one the crew was passing and grabbed me and the door.  A close shave and a bollocking from the crew member.


As we steamed down the Medway, we were passing what I think were naval ships.  As we passed on of the ships, two girls in their skimpy underwear came out of a cabin giggling and were locked out.  Many of the men (well oiled) on the Medway Queen were cheering and went to that side to get a better view.  This was followed by an urgent announcement from the captain telling the men to get back as so many of them on one side were causing the boat to list.  I remember someone remarking that one of the paddles was almost out of the water.


All in all, a grand day out.