Author Topic: Surviving Roman features in more modern Kent buildings  (Read 922 times)

Offline johnfilmer

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Re: Surviving Roman features in more modern Kent buildings
« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2021, 07:52:00 AM »
St Margaret’s church at Wychling has some flat tile like bricks clearly visible in its outside wall.


I was told by a local archeological expert, that these are probably Roman, but their source is, as yet, unknown with no local Roman buildings discovered.


When circumstances permit, a visit is worthwhile to this atmospheric little church in the woods.
Illegitimus nil carborundum

Offline Stewie

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Re: Surviving Roman features in more modern Kent buildings
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2021, 07:31:01 AM »
In the basement of a tattoo parlour in Rochester High street, there is a section of the original Roman road (Watling Street), though I don't believe that this is on general public display. Also a section of the the southern side of the Fort Horsted ditch in Chatham is lined with flint rather than concrete and I was told that they believe this came from another Roman road which was disturbed whilst constructing the fort in the 19th century.


There is a Roman museum in Canterbury which has the footprints of some Roman buildings and some good educational material, we took our granddaughter here when she was doing this period at school.

Offline Cosmo Smallpiece

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Surviving Roman features in more modern Kent buildings
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2021, 12:13:25 AM »
I was pondering on the remains of Roman buildings in Kent. There are many famous large Roman structures that still survive to this day. Like the lighthouse at Dover, Richborough Castle, various town walls, major street foundations, etc. What about smaller less important Roman buildings?


I mean there must have been smaller individual stone/brick structures that will have seemed far sturdy than the celtic stuff that went before and would still surely have lingered for some time in the Saxon era after 400AD. Would these not have continued in use as houses, barns etc, and been steadily repaired through the ages. Might some still survive as parts of houses still? I don't know of any.