Author Topic: Nelson in 1801  (Read 2342 times)

Offline Mike Gunnill

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Re: Nelson in 1801
« Reply #5 on: December 17, 2022, 07:14:47 PM »
Stuart:


Thank you for your replies, I am grateful.


In your travels have you heard the term, Nelson's Oak?  During the funeral of Captain Parker, Nelson was seen to steady himself while weeping against an oak tree.  It was called Nelson's Oak for this reason. For some strange reason, the oak was removed by the council.




Mike
Mike Gunnill

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Offline stuartwaters

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Re: Nelson in 1801
« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2022, 05:45:02 PM »
If you want more details of Nelson's Raids on Boulogne, see my post about HMS Medusa
"I did not say the French would not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Admiral Sir John Jervis, 1st Earl St Vincent.

Offline grandarog

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Re: Nelson in 1801
« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2022, 04:31:42 PM »
I would like to add my penny worth to Stuarts well informed input.
As a result of the battle there would have been a large number injured .Probably far more seamen than officers. Consequently in the old hierarchy and class system (still applicable in the services today.) it was not considered the done thing for officers to have to bunk in or have to eat and share facilities with other ranks.
 The hospital was probably over loaded and could not provide sufficient separate wards for all the Officers so some would be billet-ted out in private addresses (nowadays called Hirings).

Offline stuartwaters

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Re: Nelson in 1801
« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2022, 03:12:49 PM »
Hi Mike, you've heard the expression "up the creek"? That refers to the Naval Hospital at Haslar, at the end of Haslar Creek near Portsmouth. It refers to the chances of survival because a journey "up the creek" was likely to be a one way trip.


These officers were found lodgings in Deal most likely because it was felt they'd be more likely to survive their injuries there rather than in the hospital. They were also probably able to pay for a better standard of care too, whereas the Naval Hospital was free to serving personnel.


Early 19th Century medicine was primitive to say the least, bacteria and their effects on people, especially wounded people had yet to be discovered and what advances were made in medicine were through observations of the effects of actions and treatments. Read my articles about HMS Formidable and HMS Union for more details about how some of the advances made.
"I did not say the French would not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Admiral Sir John Jervis, 1st Earl St Vincent.

Offline Mike Gunnill

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Nelson in 1801
« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2022, 01:11:14 PM »
Hello:


Naval expert needed please.




After the failed Battle of Boulogne in 1801, the injured and most of the dead came back to the Naval Hospital in Deal. Two of Nelson's favourite's Captain Parker and Flag-Lt Langford were found "lodgings" in Deal. Wouldn't they have been better in hospital?  Why the lodgings?


Any ideas?


Thx
Mike Gunnill

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