Author Topic: An Extraordinary Phenomenon  (Read 447 times)

Offline Smiffy

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Re: An Extraordinary Phenomenon
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2019, 01:49:52 PM »
Yes, if this actually happened it's odd that such a phenomenon, visible to thousands in the middle of the afternoon, doesn't seem to have been widely spoken of or reported in the more popular press.
 
Perhaps this could be moved elsewhere at a later date if we get a more suitable subject heading.

Offline bertroid

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Re: An Extraordinary Phenomenon
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2019, 01:31:02 AM »
Ermm... Yes it's not probably windmill related.  I haven't got the foggiest on early UFO's etc, but the drama portrayed possibly might fall into that category.  Be interesting if it was repeated elsewhere, or someone was having too much gin and having a laugh!

Offline Smiffy

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An Extraordinary Phenomenon
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2019, 12:59:09 AM »

Originally posted on the old forum under "Extreme Weather", we haven't an equivalent section but as it's related to a mill I thought it might fit in here.
 
Chatham, England. November 4th, 1867.
 
"On the afternoon of Monday the 4th, between the hours of three and four, I witnessed a very extraordinary sight in the heavens. I have not heard of any one hereabout having seen it. The facts are as follow: At the time above mentioned I was passing by the Mill by the Water-works Reservoir*. On the gallery I noticed the miller uttering exclamations of surprise, and looking earnestly towards the west. On inquiring what took his attention so much, he said, "Look, sir, I never saw such a sight in my life!" On turning in the direction towards which he was looking, the west**, I also was astounded - numberless black discs in groups and scattered were passing rapidly through the air. He said his attention was directed to them by his little girl, who called to him in the Mill, saying, "Look, father, here are a lot of balloons coming!" They continued for more than twenty minutes, the time I stayed. In passing in front of the sun they appeared like large cannon shot. Several groups passed over my head, disappearing suddenly, and leaving puffs of greyish brown vapour very much like smoke".
 
James E. Beveridge, Symons's Monthly Meteorological Magazine, 2:130, 1867.
 
*This description matches Star Mill on the Darland banks.
**In the general direction of Luton.